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Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis

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2019 Labelle Lecture will be presented by Dr. Jennifer Walker

19 Jul 2019

The 28th annual Labelle Lecture will be presented  on Thursday, November 14,  2019, on the topic of Indigenous Data and Research by Dr. Jennifer Walker, associate professor, School of Rural and Northern Health at Laurentian University, who holds a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Health. She is also the Indigenous Lead for the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

The annual Labelle Lecture was created 28 years ago to honour Roberta Labelle, who was one of the founding members of CHEPA. Her death in 1991 was unexpected, and occurred when broad recognition for her research in health economics was just starting to emerge. 

Dr. Walker has Indigenous (Haudenosaunee) family roots and is a member of the Six Nations of the Grand River. She has a PhD in Community Health Sciences (Epidemiology specialization) from the University of Calgary and a BSc from the University of Waterloo.

This presentation provides a comprehensive overview of the guiding frameworks used to assert Indigenous data governance best practices, including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, and the First Nations Information Governance Centre’s principles of Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession (OCAP ®). The abstract for her presentation is below. 

The lecture will take place on Thursday Nov. 14, 2019 from 3 pm to 4:30 pm in HSC 1A4, followed by a reception in the Farncombe Atrium.

The lecture will be preceded by the graduate student conference New Frontiers in Health Policy, which this year looks at drivers for change in health services and policy. Registration is free, and is open until November 1. For more information about the conference, click here.

Abstract:

The historical colonial context of health research speaks to the importance of using trauma-informed approaches in the research process. These approaches acknowledge and address the unique experiences of Indigenous communities involved in research and highlight the diverse health needs and protocols for responsible community engagement. This presentation provides a comprehensive overview of the guiding frameworks used to assert Indigenous data governance best practices, including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action, and the First Nations Information Governance Centre’s principles of Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession (OCAP ®). These guiding frameworks emphasize the importance of honouring the rights, strengths, and resilience of Indigenous Nations, individuals, families and communities throughout the research process. Drawing on concrete examples of selected projects, this presentation describes and presents examples that speak to the value of: Indigenous-driven projects; respectful and reciprocal research relationships environments with Indigenous communities; knowledge mobilization that respects community perspectives and research priorities; strengthening research capacity through ethical relationships; and integrating Indigenous perspectives and models of wellbeing.

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